Skip to main content

Research Guides

Audio & Video Research Guide: Using Video in Courses

This guide provides links to and information about audio and video resources at the UW and beyond.

Using Video for Teaching

This guide describes the ways in which the Libraries can support the use of video in your teaching at UW Seattle. Each option has a description of resources available through the Libraries and brief explanation of relevant copyright principles. This explanation should not be interpreted as legal advice. Instructors will decide which option is most appropriate based on their pedagogical needs.

1. Classroom Screening

  • Service: UW Libraries DVDs and other media formats can be checked out by instructors for viewing in face-to-face classroom teaching. 
  • Locations for Viewing: DVDs and other media may be viewed in your classroom, depending on the availability of playback equipment.
  • Copyright: Section 110(1) of the Copyright Act of 1976 permits instructors at nonprofit educational institutions to show entire films in the course of face-to-face classroom teaching provided that the video was lawfully made and acquired.

2. Course Reserves and In-Library Screening

  • Service: Instructors can place DVDs and other media on Course Reserve in the Libraries Media Arcade for in-library viewing. Instructors can also use Media Arcade and other spaces in the Libraries for viewing DVDs and other media that are not on Course Reserve. 
  • Locations for Viewing: Individual students or small groups of students can watch Course Reserve videos and other media in the Media Arcade. Non-course reserve media can also be viewed in Media Arcade, as well as in Odegaard LibraryResearch Commons, Music Library, and other locations. Instructors may also reserve Allen Auditorium for larger screenings (49 seat capacity). 
  • Copyright: DVDs and other media in the Libraries collection may be loaned out used for personal viewing under the first sale doctrine.

3. Streaming Video – Licensed Collections

  • Service: The Libraries provides access to many licensed streaming video collections
  • Locations for Viewing: Libraries staff will provide links for your Canvas or other LMS site so students will be able to view the film from any location with Internet access.
  • Copyright: The Libraries has license agreements with the database providers to make these films available in streaming format for UW faculty, staff, and students.

4. Streaming Video – Licensed Free Sites

  • Service: Libraries staff will search to determine whether a particular film or episode is available on a licensed free site, such as as network websites, Hulu, or YouTube.
  • Locations for Viewing: Libraries staff will provide links for your Canvas or other LMS site so students will be able to view the film from any location with Internet access.
  • Copyright: These films and episodes should be available in streaming format at no cost.

5. Streaming Video - Commercial Sites (Student pays)

  • Service: Media Arcade staff will notify you of low-cost streaming options for streaming films and TV episodes from commercial services, such as Amazon, iTunes, Google Play, HuluPlus, or Netflix. The cost to stream a video on Amazon, iTunes, or Google Play is usually $1.99 - $3.99. Basic subscriptions to Netflix or HuluPlus are $7.99 per month. (as of Feb. 2017)
  • Locations for Viewing: Media Arcade staff will provide purchase links for your students. Once purchased, students should be able to view the film from any location with Internet access.
  • Copyright: These streaming films and episodes are individually licensed and purchased by students.

6. Stream Clips from Films or Episodes

  • Service: Media Arcade staff can assist you with creating and embedding clips from DVDs, VHS and other media into your Canvas site.
  • Locations for Viewing: Media Arcade staff will help you place a link in your Canvas site so students will be able to view the film from any location with Internet access. In-depth Canvas help is available through Learning & Scholarly Technologies
  • Copyright: The TEACH Act permits streaming reasonable and limited portions of a video for educational purposes. In addition, streaming limited portions of a film or tv show could qualify as fair use based on an analysis of the four fair use factors:
    • the purpose and character of the use
    • the nature of the copyrighted work
    • the amount and substantiality used
    • the effect of the use upon the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work.

7. Stream Entire Films or Episodes (With permission)

  • Service: If you own rights or have obtained rights to stream a film, Media Arcade staff may be able to assist you with streaming the film or video in its entirety. Some DVDs can be purchased with streaming rights, and those titles may also be streamed in their entirety. More information about the Libraries policy on purchasing streaming is available here.
  • Locations for Viewing: Media Arcade staff  can assist you with placing a link in your Canvas site so students will be able to view the film from any location with Internet access.
  • Copyright: In the cases described above, you own the copyright, have permission or a license to stream the full work, or the Libraries has purchased the rights at your request, so there shouldn’t be a copyright issue.

8. Stream Entire Films or Episodes (Without permission)

  • If rights to a film cannot be obtained through any of the methods listed above, in-library use is not practical, and showing clips will not meet the pedagogical needs of the faculty, a fair use analysis for streaming the film in its entirety will be required by the instructor to evaluate the appropriateness and potential risk in the context of the four fair use factors . See this guide for more information, or contact Libraries staff for assistance.
  • Copyright: There may be circumstances where a film or episode can be streamed in its entirety under the fair use doctrine. That determination has to be made by instructors on a case-by-case basis by weighing and balancing the four fair use factors.

This page has been adapted from the Georgetown University Library's Guide to Using Films in Courses (2017).