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Research Guides

Young Adult Fiction A - E

Recommended by: Cherise Fuselier, Student UW Seattle, iSchool

"This YA series features an albino Nigerian-American teenage girl named Sunny. It takes place in Nigeria, and Sunny and her friends have magical powers and must fight evil. It's kind of like a more diverse Harry Potter, Nigerian-style. The author is a Nigerian-American woman."


 

Recommended by: Cherise Fuselier, Student UW Seattle, iSchool

"This YA series features an albino Nigerian-American teenage girl named Sunny. It takes place in Nigeria, and Sunny and her friends have magical powers and must fight evil. It's kind of like a more diverse Harry Potter, Nigerian-style. The author is a Nigerian-American woman."


 

Recommended by: Jose D Sanchez Frugone, Student UW Seattle, Bioengineering

"This book is a very personal, honest coming to age novel about teenage love. At moments poetic and romantic, at moments messy and starkly real. With a backdrop of lgbt and minority themes which add context but do not overpower the beautifully written experiences of a character in conflict with himself; this book explores identity, family relations, friendship, and love in a way that is relevant to all."


 

Recommended by: Nicole Gustavsen, Staff UW Bothell, UWB / Cascadia College Library

"West African fantasy by a Nigerian American author! The more non-"swords and sorcery"/White European fantasy (and science fiction) literature we can support and provide access to, the better."


 

Michelle H. Martin, Faculty UW Seattle, iSchool

"Every day A, the protagonist wakes up, A is in a different person's body. An interesting study in diversity. A says that whether or not A likes the body A is inhabiting, they must respect it, regardless. Written by a while male but offers lots of great food for thought. Also a movie now."


 

Young Adult Fiction F - Z

Recommended by: K Wheeler, Student UW Seattle

"This is an amazing book about racial diversity, equity, and police brutality."



 

Recommended by: Anonymous, Student UW Seattle

"Mockingbird is a middle grade children's novel told in a first person prose perceptive from a young girl with Asperger's. I remember reading this book as a child and feeling connected to the protagonist, despite our many differences. Caitlin, the main character, struggles with middle school and family issues, yet always remains a strong and true individual that I believe many children and even adults could learn from."


 

Recommended by: Anonymous

This Holocaust-era novelized memoir is an important companion piece to works like The Diary of Anne Frank or Number the Stars, with their pleasant and relatable main characters. The difficult, often angry protagonist of this book helps the reader to understand the toll that refugee life takes - as she is shuttled from one living situation to another - and illuminates the unrealistic expectations that societies often place on their most vulnerable residents."


 

Recommended by: K Wheeler, Student UW Seattle

"This book helps the reader tackle the misconception that a person who can't communicate in a 'normal' way is unintelligent, as well as showing the importance of assistive technology, and of respecting your peers."


 

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